Node.js or PHP for a large-scale web platform?

PHP is great, especially with the newest releases, it offers great performance and lots of improvements, but still, Node.js shows better performance due to the async approach.

tufayalhossin
tufayalhossin
Tufayal Hossin Emon

  • The Riskiest Thing Is To Take No Risks.
  • Writen article 12
Node.js or PHP for a large-scale web platform?

Here's what we've been up to recently.


Node.js or PHP for a large-scale web platform?

Both PHP with Laravel and Node.js with NestJS will do the work, but there are some things, we took into consideration that helped us make a decision:

  1. PHP is great, especially with the foremost recent releases, it offers great performance and many improvements, but still, Node.js shows better performance thanks to the async approach.
  2. The well-known advantage of using JavaScript for the tooshie and front also gives us plenty more flexibility within the event team — this suggests that more developers can contribute to both the front and rear and collaborate more on different components of the merchandise we are visiting be building.
  3. NestJS enforces good DDD architecture and separation of concerns, so one can invite an Angular Front-End developer to figure on the underside and he/she would manage with ease.
  4. Node.js is best when it involves building a JSON API — it's not messing up with HTML (separation of concerns), while with PHP you'll need the temptation to serve HTML right from the monolith
  5. Node.js and particularly the NestJS communities feel more conversant. within the PHP world, it takes longer to filter the noise, there's much knowledge for each potential problem you have got in PHP, but most of the solutions are far from the foremost effective
  6. With the rapidly growing ecosystem around JavaScript, which has its pros and cons, comes NestJS which provides the promise of LTS and relies on proven architecture and principles plenty.
  7. A of popular programming languages like Python, Java, C, and Ruby could even be compiled to JavaScript — see here
  8. npm/yarn have an oversized pool of dependencies which require more wise picking and double-checking when it involves installing yet one more dependency within the project. Personally, I don’t think the composer world is much different. you usually should consider and verify after you invite another person to contribute to the code inside a project.
  9. TypeScript is way better than PHP’s native sorts of “warning” support. Of course, it comes with a learning curve for those that haven't used a strongly typed language and its drawbacks once you would like to use some npm dependency that doesn’t have TypeScript support, but the very fact is that nearly all of the popular packages have already got it.

within the top, supported all of the above, we chose Node.js up to now everything looks promising in terms of performance, development speed, unit testing. we'll be happy to share another update after a pair of months, where we are visiting cover the most important challenges we've got faced and essentially provide a solution to the question. Would not or not it's better if we were doing this with PHP?


Further Resources For You

Here's what we've been up to recently.

View all